The Marquis of Granby, Knaresbourough

The Marquis of Granby, Knaresbourough


Photo by Mtaylor848 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Marquis of Granby, Knaresbourough

The Marquis of Granby, Knaresbourough


Photo by Mtaylor848 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

It is one of those bizarre facts that I know from some quiz that the title ‘Marquis of Granby’ was the commonest name commemorating an individual for a public house in England. I had wondered why and on my recent visit to the Household cavalry Museum I discovered the answer.

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John Manners, Marquis of Granby, was born in 1721. In 1741 he was elected as MP for Grantham and in 1745 was commissioned to a regiment raised by the Duke of Rutland (his father and indecently another very common public house name) to fight the Jacobite rebellion. He served on the staff of the Duke of Cumberland and in 1752 was appointed as colonel in the Blues (Royal Horse Guards). However he was not popular with the King who blocked his appointment. He returned to politics being elected as MP for Cambridgeshire in 1754 and his appointment to the Blues was finally ratified two years later. He commanded a cavalry brigade during the 7 years war. At the battle of Warburg his hat and wig were blown off (see painting above), but contrary to custom still saluted his commander when he rode up. This action is commemorated by the tradition the non-commissioned officers and troopers from the Blues may salute officers whilst not wearing headdress (the only soldiers in the British army permitted to do so). On his return from the war he continued his role in parliament. In 1766 he was appointed Commander in chief of the army but resigned from this and his parliamentary seat in 1770. He died shortly afterwards.

But what is the connection between John Manners and Public Houses?

The Marquis of Granby, New Cross London

The Marquis of Granby, New Cross London


Photo by Ewan Munro from London, UK (Marquis of Granby, New Cross, SE14 Uploaded by Fæ) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Well, he made it a habit to look after his troopers when they retired from the regiment, most commonly by buying public houses and set the ex-troopers up as publicans. As a thank-ypu these pubs were named ‘The Marquis of Granby’ in his honour.

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