Thames Journey (8): Canary Wharf and the Isle of Dogs

Posted: December 8, 2014 in History, London, UK
Tags: , ,

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The Isle of dogs in East London is now better known as canary wharf or London Docklands. It used to be an island cut off from the mainland by waterways and latterly by the West India docks. Due to the reclamation of the docks during the redevelopment of the area is is now linked by land where once the south dock basin was situated

The entrance into all that remains of the West India Docks. The basin behind the gates is now a marina for private boats

The entrance into all that remains of the West India Docks. The basin behind the gates is now a marina for private boats

The area was completely redeveloped in the 1970s and 80s and from its dockland and industrial past, it has now become an area of residential and commercial activity with many large financial institutions choosing to move here from the financial quarter of the City of London

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The name ‘Isle of dogs’ has many possible origins. These include a corruption of ‘isle of ducks’ or ‘isle of dykes’. Others have suggested that King Edward III kept his hunting dogs on the island whilst some have argued that it was not King Edward but Henry VIII whose dogs were housed on the island.

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