Statues and Monuments: Sir John Moore

Posted: December 10, 2015 in History, London, UK
Tags: ,
Sir John Moore memorial - St Paul's Cathedral London

Sir John Moore memorial – St Paul’s Cathedral London

 

John Moore was born in Glasgow in 1761. He joined the Army at the age of 15 serving in the 51st Regiment of foot. in 1778 his regiment was sent to America where he saw action in the War of Independence particularly during the Penobscot expedition. After five years he returned to the UK and became MP for Lanark until 1790. He was posted to the Mediterranean and was stationed in Corsica, where he was made: a colonel. In 1796 he was posted  to the West Indies and was prominent in the recovery of St Lucia following the French inspired uprising. Two years later he was posted to Ireland and in 1801 made commander of the 52nd Regiment of foot, whom he led in the campaign in Egypt the following year.

Thomas Lawrence [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Lawrence [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

In 1803 he returned to the UK and was appointed commander at the training facility at Shorncliffe camp in Kent, where he initiated a number of innovative training regimes including the development of light infantry. At the outbreak of war Napoleon, he was placed in charge of coastal defences and it was his initiative that Martello towers were built along the coast and that the Royal military canal was constructed.

Martello Tower by Thomas Fawdry. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/27479082@N02/)

Martello Tower by Thomas Fawdry. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/27479082@N02/)

In the years that followed he saw active service in the Mediterranean and in Sweden before being posted in 1808 to be commander of British forces in the Iberian Peninsula. In 1809 he was fatally wounded whilst leading his troops at the Battle of Corunna, though he lived long enough to be told that his troops had secured a victory over the French.

Sir John Moore memorial - St Paul's Cathedral London

Sir John Moore memorial – St Paul’s Cathedral London

By Aquatint by Heath, William (1795-1840) engraved by Sutherland, Thomas (b.1785) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The Death of Sir John Moore by Aquatint by Heath, William (1795-1840) engraved by Sutherland, Thomas (b.1785) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sir John Moore was buried in the city and when the French eventually took control, Marshall Soult, the French commander, ordered that a monument be built over his grave.

By Marcus (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

The tomb of Sir John Moore by Marcus (Own work) [GFDL (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Sir John Moore is best remembered for his innovative Army training methods and in recognition of this the home of the Army Training Regiment at Winchester is called the John Moore barracks.

 

 

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