Archive for the ‘York’ Category

Views of York (6)

Posted: February 28, 2014 in History, Roman History, UK, York
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Roamn legion building mark - IX Hispania stationed at York after conquest of North

Roamn legion building mark – IX Hispania stationed at York after conquest of North

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carving from exterior of York Minster

carving from exterior of York Minster

York Minster

York Minster

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The god Sol, here carved in the fashion of a Celtic Sun God or a classical Gorgon. The Romans often incorporated local gods or interpretations into the Roman pantheon as a way of binding the peoples of the Empire together.

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The god Mithras, a favourite of the Roman soldiers. The cult of Mithras was for men only and they met in temples which resembled caves.

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A statue of Animanes, the devil who fought with Mithras. His lion head is unfortunately missing. This was commissioned by Volusius Iraenaeus after Animanes had aided him in some unspecified venture.

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This is an altar to Serapis, an Egyptian god who was a favourite of the Emperor Septimus Severus. This alter indicates the flexibility of the Roman religious system which allowed for God’s from all over the Empire to be incorporated, and worshipped. This alter was set up by Claudius Hieronymianus, the legate (commanding officer) of the sixth legion

These tombstones can all be seen in the Museum of Yorkshire.

Views of York (5)

Posted: February 22, 2014 in History, Roman History, UK, York
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Column from Roman headquarters building (4th century AD)

Column from Roman headquarters building (4th century AD)

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The birthplace of Guy Fawkes

The birthplace of Guy Fawkes

York Minster

York Minster

York Minster close

York Minster close

The inscriptions on Roman tombstones can often give us information about the people who lived and worked in the city

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The tombstone of Decimina, daughter of Decimius

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The tombstone of Arciaco, a Roman centurion who public came from northern Italy. His tombstone gives equal honour to his own personal god and to the divine emperor.

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This coffin is something of a mystery. According to the inscription, it was the coffin of Julia Fortuna of Sardinia. However, the skeleton inside was that of a male, suggesting that the tomb may have been reused at some later date than the original burial to house a second body.

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This is the tomb of a blacksmith. The image shows him at work in his forge.

these tombstones can all be seen in the Museum of Yorkshire

Views of York (4)

Posted: February 15, 2014 in History, UK, York
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St Williams college (15th Century)

St Williams college (15th Century)

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Anglo-Saxon Eoforwic was a thriving commercial centre. Artistry, industry and learning flourished within the city. It is at this period that the first schools and churches were founded in York. It may have been this prosperity which first attracted the Viking raiders in the ninth century.

Many examples of Anglo-Saxon craftsmanship on display in the museum of Yorkshire.

Anglo-Saxon jewellery

Anglo-Saxon jewellery

Anglo-Saxon comb and hair grip

Anglo-Saxon comb and hair grip

Views of York (3)

Posted: February 7, 2014 in History, UK, York
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Fairfax House

Fairfax House

Clifford's tower

Clifford’s tower

Cathedral from the Suburbs

Cathedral from the Suburbs

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Tower on city wall

Tower on city wall

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This eighth century Anglo-Saxon helmet was found at Coppergate in York. It is only one of four found in the UK. It was made for member of the Anglo-Saxon royal family called Oshere and his name is inscribed above the nose guard.

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It is in very good condition and was found late in a wooden box, suggesting that it was deliberately placed there rather than discarded. Possibly Oshere had grown old and had no longer any use for it or maybe it was to hide such a valuable item people who might steal it.

The Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Eoforwic came to an end in the ninth century when the Vikings overran the kingdom and made York their capital, Jorvik.

Lendal tower in York forms part of the defensive curtain of the city wall.

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It protected both a crossing from the south side of the river by rope ferry and also controlled River access to the city from upstream. The tower dates from the 13th century and was built as a partner for the Barker tower, which stands on the south side of the river. At night an iron chain would be strung between the two towers to prevent boats entering the city during the hours of darkness. It was also used during times of unrest and war to prevent river access to the city.

Lendal Tower

Lendal Tower

Barker Tower

Barker Tower

Today they form the two ends of Lendal Bridge, which until recently has been one of the major access roads to the city centre and it would be easy to imagine that they were built to guard access via the bridge. However this is not an ancient bridge site and the earliest bridge here only dates from the middle 1800s.

I think one of the great things about the completeness of the city walls in York is that most of the original gateways remain in place. They vary considerably from the very simple to those which are much more elaborate and includes accommodation within them. In some cases the original accommodation over the gates has been converted at a later date to provide more hospitable accommodation for the people living there.

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